Four Countries Reject Su-57E, Except Myanmar

A Russian Su-57 fighter jet is on fire due to instrument overheating. Source VKS.

The Su-57 first flew in 2010. But development was painfully slow. As of early 2018, the 10 Su-57 prototypes possessed “inadequate and incomplete sensors, incomplete fire-control systems and self-protection suites, no operational integrated avionics and … unreliable engines,” aviation expert Tom Cooper said.

Russia has begun negotiating with Southeast Asian countries to sell Su-57 fighters at $40 million apiece. It begs a question, why Russia’s next-generation fighter jet cost $25 million less than Su-35 fighters? Is it really a fighter jet or fighter jet is in making?

The Russian side began to negotiate with five countries at once on the sale of its next-generation Su-57 fighters. According to the Sohu news agency, four of all five potential buyers of Russian next-generation fighters rejected the offer except Myanmar. These countries are Vietnam, Myanmar, Malaysia, Thailand and Indonesia.

A Su-57s engine malfunction during factory trials.

The Su-57 (NATO nickname Felon) was conceived almost two decades ago, with the first prototype taking to the skies back in 2010. Around a dozen more, known during development as T-50 and PAK FA, were manufactured during the pre-production period, RT reported.

Sukhoi builds the twin-engine Su-57 at the Komsomolsk-on-Amur aircraft plant in the Russian Far East. The factory previously built the non-stealthy Su-35—and learned some hard lessons.

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Now, several years after building the Su-35, managers at Komsomolsk-on-Amur are setting up Su-57 production in the plant’s Shop 45.

According to Russian news agency Avia Pro, Sukhoi desperately needs to the sale 50 Su-57 fighters to keep its Su-57 production line open.

It is not known at what stage the negotiations are at the moment, however, experts believe that these countries already rejected Su-57 fighters already except Myanmar is willing to buy 12 Su-57 if the economy permits.

The Su-57 first flew in 2010. But development was painfully slow. As of early 2018, the 10 Su-57 prototypes possessed “inadequate and incomplete sensors, incomplete fire-control systems and self-protection suites, no operational integrated avionics and … unreliable engines,” aviation expert Tom Cooper said. 

Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu told a Defense Ministry’s board meeting that a total of 22 Sukhoi-57 planes would be provided by the end of 2028.



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